GrowingSouthwark's Blog


Myatts Field
February 23, 2010, 11:47 am
Filed under: birds, events, fruit trees, myatts field, planting, stag beetle, Uncategorized

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED TO PLANT FRUIT TREES

We need people to help us plant a range of fruit trees and bushes around Myatt’s Fields Park greenhouse on Saturday March 6th 2010 from 1pm – 4pm.

The fruit will be used to supply the park’s café and for cooking projects involving local people in the park.

We would very much appreciate as much help as possible with this, so please contact Victoria Sherwin on 0207 926 0394 to book your place. Children welcome. Please wear suitable clothing as it will be muddy.

BUILD A STAG BEETLE HOTEL AND LEARN ABOUT STAG BEETLES

Children will be able to help build a stag beetle hotel in the wildlife area this Saturday February 27th at Myatt’s Fields Park.

They will be given the chance to learn more about these fascinating and endangered creatures during the free session which runs from 2pm – 4pm.

Lambeth Play Association will also be offered free play activities from 1pm – 4pm.

BIRD WATCHING IN MYATT’S FIELDS PARK: SEND US YOUR PHOTOS

A local resident sent us the following summary of birds you might see in Myatt’s Fields Park at the moment:

First the big ones – black carrion crows stomping around on the grass and often quarrelling with other crows; wood pigeons feeding on the ground and roosting in the trees; ‘London ‘ pigeons (feral rock doves) in flocks after bread; green ring-necked parakeets descended from escaped pets – the noisiest birds in the park – and black- headed gulls, usually flying over the park.

Next the medium size: we are still seeing flocks of 40-50 redwings, small thrushes with spotted breasts and a red stripe under the wing, feeding on worms on the grass. They are passing through on their way to nest in Scandinavia and will disappear as soon as warmer weather comes. They often mix with starlings, also in small flocks. Then we have resident and migrant blackbirds digging in leaves under the bushes, and occasionally a great -spotted woodpecker, who may soon send a message for a mate by drumming on one of the trees.

Finally the smaller birds: the robins are establishing their territories by singing vigorously at the start and end of the day. We have a flock of goldfinches – red and gold- often in the tops of the plane trees; and greenfinches with a wheezy sort of song. Great tits and blue tits are the commonest birds in the park; dunnocks are small brown birds that stay under cover, and the wren, smallest of all, is also staying out of sight most of the time. House sparrows are around some of the bird tables in the area, but are hardly ever in the park.

PLEASE SEND US ANY PHOTOS YOU TAKE OF BIRDS IN THE PARK, PARTICULARLY THE MORE UNUSUAL. WE HOPE TO PRODUCE A LEAFLET ABOUT THE PARK AND WOULD LOVE TO INCLUDE PICTURES BY LOCAL PEOPLE
Sherwin,Victoria [VSherwin@lambeth.gov.uk]

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